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The Most Expensive Flowers In The World

Flowers are one of the most natural beauties of the world. They are also one of the most preferred gifts for loved ones. For women, Flowers are all time favorite. That is why men gift flowers to their partners. To win the heart of your girl, it may not cost you much but if you are planning to gift her below mentioned flowers, then you must think twice before making a plan! From rare orchids to a flower that lives for just a few hours, here’s a list of the some of the most expensive flowers found anywhere in the world.

Kadupul Flower

Epiphyllum oxypetalum is a species of cactus and one of the most cultivated species in its genus. A fleeting beauty that blooms as infrequently as once a year. And when it does bloom, it does so in the dark of night and withers away before dawn. Pure white petals, spread out just like those of a white water lily. Garlanded by the long leaves of the cactus, which create a trail of a bitter scent, a magnificent flower blooms just one night each year. Known as ‘Kadupul’ in native Sinhala, it is commonly called the “Queen of the night”. The blossom emits a soothing scent that encapsulates many, yet even for the busy pollinators its pleasure can only be enjoyed for a few hours on a single night. It is a flower that cannot be picked without causing damage to it, it simply can’t be purchased. Reports say Kadupul flowers cannot be bought by anyone in this earth as it is priceless!

Juliet Rose

Making its debut in 2006 at the Chelsea Flower Show, and took the floral world by storm not only for its elegance and blushing beauty, but because it was one of the most expensive flowers ever developed. It is known as the “£3 million rose”, which is equivalent to approximately $15.8 million. To buy this, you have to earn as much as $16 million! Although the heavenly Juliet rose can be purchased for less than this, it is known as the “£3 million rose” because that’s how much it cost famed rose breeder David Austin to create the apricot-hued hybrid over the course of 15 years.

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